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The planned-market book - YA fantasy and SF
...for adult readers!
fernwithy
ya_f_sf
fernwithy
The planned-market book
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ladyvorkosigan From: ladyvorkosigan Date: August 2nd, 2006 04:11 am (UTC) (Link)
I have the same reaction as you, but I'll add that I still have fond memories of the Baby-Sitters Club books, even knowing they're team written (and, umm, that the actual objective quality was probably a lot lower than it seemed to my 9-year-old self). I wonder if part of it is the message they're conveying? As you say - "Girls like cats! Let's write about cats!" (or babysitting) is hardly the same as "Well, girls admire rich socialites - let's give them stories about bulilmic New York princesses who live for boys and clothes." They're both appealing to already existing tastes, but they're likely to encourage trends and tastes as well, and the second (a) is meant to sell a lot more than just books, and (b) encourages behavior that's a bit less appealing.
fernwithy From: fernwithy Date: August 2nd, 2006 12:34 pm (UTC) (Link)
I honestly haven't read the Gossip Girl books--they looked very, very boring--and have only glanced cursorily at the Sisterhood books and seen the movie. My colleague, who was more into mundanefic, gobbled all of them down, and had been recommending them to girls who liked romances and so forth; she felt like she'd been completely duped by liars.

The Sisterhood books are, as far as I can tell, mostly straight fic with a touch of fantasy (magical jeans that fit all four girls, and important things happen while they're wearing them, though the important things are of the mundane variety). They also aren't the ones with the fashionista advertising. But it still gave me a gross feeling to find out they were marketeted quite as cynically as they were. Maybe because they tried to market it as Stand By Me for girls, which I always thought was silly, as, to the best of my knowledge, SBM was SBM for girls; it just happened to be about boys. (I wrote this about it lat year.) The fact that it's a couple of guys analyzing the girls' market and then tailoring books to fit it is bothersome... and yet, girls do like the stupid things. Why should I be bothered?

But I'm not at all bothered by the whole thing with SF/F, even if it had been approached the same way.

9 comments or Leave a comment